MPERA's blog

Judging an Ebook by its Cover

It doesn’t matter if a book is paper or pixels: Covers matter. We are drawn to images, and the brighter and more appealing the image, the more briskly the book circulates.

But there’s a problem. For many public domain, Creative Commons, and self-published works, no image is available. And so libraries sometimes use totally generic covers—the title of the book with a book or film icon to indicate format, for instance.

But it’s boring and works against the discovery of appealing titles.

DCL Ebook Report September 2014

Read the Douglas County (Colo.) Libraries Ebook Report as a PDF file.

There are some distinct oddities in this month's report.

On the library pricing for print, Ingrams seems consistently cheaper than Baker & Taylor. And in one case (Dragonfly in Amber) Baker & Taylor charges twice as much.

AL Live: The Kid and Teen-Friendly Library

The July 10 episode of American Libraries Live (AL Live), “The Kid and Teen-Friendly Library,” featured a discussion on getting children and youth involved with the library and library services. Jennifer Velasquez, coordinator of teen services for the San Antonio (Tex.) Public Library System and a lecturer in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at San José (Calif.) State University, moderated the following panelists as they shared their insights on the topic:

Q&A with Laurie R. King

Laurie R. King is the bestselling author of 23 books, known for her detective/mystery fiction, including the Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes and Kate Martinelli mysteries. She spoke Monday at the United for Libraries Gala Author Tea during the 2014 ALA Annual Conference and Exhibition.

American Libraries: What kind of books did you enjoy reading when you were younger?

An Interview with Heather Gudenkauf

Heather Gudenkauf, author of The Weight of Silence and Little Mercies, was featured as a speaker at the United for Libraries Gala Author Tea at the 2014 ALA Annual Conference and Exhibition in Las Vegas. She sat down with American Libraries to talk about her love of reading, her writing process, and the importance of small gestures.

American Libraries: What were your interactions with libraries growing up?

AL Live: Going Beyond Google

The June 12 episode of American Libraries Live tackled the million-dollar question: Why do we need librarians if we have Google?

Creating Networking Bridges

In May, ALA’s Office for Diversity and Spectrum Scholarship Program partnered with libraries and graduate schools of library and information science in five cities—Seattle, Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York—to present essential information workshops for people interested in graduate education and careers in library and information science as part of the Knowledge Alliance project.

Taylor Swift is New Face of READing

Seven-time Grammy winner and Billboard Artist of the Year Taylor Swift can now add ALA Celebrity READ Poster to her list of accomplishments. An avid reader and strong supporter of literacy and libraries, the 24-year-old partnered with Scholastic Books to make book donations to libraries in her hometown of Reading, Pennsylvania, and Nashville, Tennessee, where she currently lives.  

IFLA/OCLC Fellows Visit ALA

Five librarians from developing countries visited ALA headquarters on May 30 as part of the annual Jay Jordan IFLA/OCLC Early Career Development Fellowship program, and spoke with American Libraries about their experiences.

Up to five individuals are selected to participate in the intensive four-week program to help provide early career development and continuing education for library and information science professionals from countries with developing economies. The 2014 class of fellows are:

Remembering Maya Angelou

Author and poet Maya Angelou died May 28 at age 86. An activist and library champion, she remains one of the most frequently challenged authors (and authors of color) of the 20th and 21st centuries, according to ALA's Office for Intellectual Freedom.

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