Blogs

2016–2017 ALA Presidential Candidates Announced: Updated

James LaRue, CEO of LaRue and Associates in Castle Rock, Colorado, Julie Todaro, dean of library services at Austin (Texas) Community College, Joseph Janes, associate professor and chair of the MLIS program at the Information School of the University of Washington in Seattle, and JP Porcaro, acquisitions and technological discovery librarian at New Jersey City University in Jersey City, are candidates for the 2016-17 presidency of the American Library Association (ALA).

Macmillan’s Ebooks Now Available to Library Consortia

OverDrive announced this week that Macmillan has lifted its restriction on licensing its ebooks to library consortia. Of the Big 5, only Hachette now has any restriction on consortium access and they continue to evaluate consortia on a case-by-case basis.

Alison Lazarus, Macmillan Sales Division president, confirmed in an email that the publisher has been working with its vendors to amend their agreements to permit licensing to consortia.

I’ll Take the Book Shaken, Not Stirred

D.C. Public Library kicked off Banned Books Week in style this year by hosting an exclusive after-hours rendezvous that included a musical orchestra and the unveiling of a series of indoor and outdoor art installations created by local artists. Roughly 300 people attended "UNCENSORED: The Preview Party," which launches "UNCENSORED: The Art Exhibition," a temporary public art event at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library.

The Gates Legacy

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation seems to be getting out of the world of libraries, which is a shame. One result of their investments has been the fascinating research conducted by the Pew Research Center.

Banned Books Week Celebrates Comics

Banned Books Week, running September 21–27, offers libraries everywhere an opportunity to celebrate challenging (and challenged) literature and let their communities exercise their freedom to read. This year is devoted to comics and graphic novels, and the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF)—a nonprofit organization devoted to free speech and defending comic book readers, retailers, publishers, and creators—has partnered with the American Library Association (ALA) to create and distribute tools and resources for libraries to use for Banned Books Week and beyond.

Children in Crisis

Sylvia Cisneros, president of Reforma: The National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking, delivered 225 Spanish-language children’s books to the Rio Grande Processing Center in McAllen, Texas, September 10, as part of the organization’s effort to help meet the social and emotional needs of unaccompanied children from Central America seeking refuge in the United States.

Judging an Ebook by its Cover

It doesn’t matter if a book is paper or pixels: Covers matter. We are drawn to images, and the brighter and more appealing the image, the more briskly the book circulates.

But there’s a problem. For many public domain, Creative Commons, and self-published works, no image is available. And so libraries sometimes use totally generic covers—the title of the book with a book or film icon to indicate format, for instance.

But it’s boring and works against the discovery of appealing titles.

DCL Ebook Report September 2014

Read the Douglas County (Colo.) Libraries Ebook Report as a PDF file.

There are some distinct oddities in this month's report.

On the library pricing for print, Ingrams seems consistently cheaper than Baker & Taylor. And in one case (Dragonfly in Amber) Baker & Taylor charges twice as much.

Following the Money

Every now and then someone publishes a link that should be slipped into every board packet in the nation. I'd like to highlight this report: "Exploring Connections: Independent Publishers and Research Libraries," by Amy Ballmer, Albert Municino, Judith Schwartz, and Robert Weiss for the Metropolitan New York Library Council.

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