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Banned Books Week Celebrates Comics

Banned Books Week, running September 21–27, offers libraries everywhere an opportunity to celebrate challenging (and challenged) literature and let their communities exercise their freedom to read. This year is devoted to comics and graphic novels, and the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF)—a nonprofit organization devoted to free speech and defending comic book readers, retailers, publishers, and creators—has partnered with the American Library Association (ALA) to create and distribute tools and resources for libraries to use for Banned Books Week and beyond.

Children in Crisis

Sylvia Cisneros, president of Reforma: The National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking, delivered 225 Spanish-language children’s books to the Rio Grande Processing Center in McAllen, Texas, September 10, as part of the organization’s effort to help meet the social and emotional needs of unaccompanied children from Central America seeking refuge in the United States.

Judging an Ebook by its Cover

It doesn’t matter if a book is paper or pixels: Covers matter. We are drawn to images, and the brighter and more appealing the image, the more briskly the book circulates.

But there’s a problem. For many public domain, Creative Commons, and self-published works, no image is available. And so libraries sometimes use totally generic covers—the title of the book with a book or film icon to indicate format, for instance.

But it’s boring and works against the discovery of appealing titles.

DCL Ebook Report September 2014

Read the Douglas County (Colo.) Libraries Ebook Report as a PDF file.

There are some distinct oddities in this month's report.

On the library pricing for print, Ingrams seems consistently cheaper than Baker & Taylor. And in one case (Dragonfly in Amber) Baker & Taylor charges twice as much.

Following the Money

Every now and then someone publishes a link that should be slipped into every board packet in the nation. I'd like to highlight this report: "Exploring Connections: Independent Publishers and Research Libraries," by Amy Ballmer, Albert Municino, Judith Schwartz, and Robert Weiss for the Metropolitan New York Library Council.

MOOCs and Library Trends Report discussed at WLIC

Pierre Dillenbourg, the academic director of the École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), spoke on his expertise, massive open online courses (MOOCs), during the August 20 plenary session at the 2014 World Library and Information Congress (WLIC) in Lyon, France. Dillenbourg organized the first European summit on MOOCs in 2013, and spoke both passionately and humorously.

ALA and German Library Association Sign Agreement

American Library Association (ALA) President Courtney Young and Barbara Lison, a representative of the German library association Bibliothek & Information Deutschland (BID), signed an agreement on Tuesday, August 19, at the World Library and Information Congress (WLIC) in Lyon, France, establishing a collaboration between the two organizations through 2019.

Turn Up the Volume

Denver Public Library (DPL) has announced a new service called Volume. The product is intriguing: 37 albums of DRM-free downloadable or streamable music by Colorado artists. The music is available to any DPL cardholder for two years as a downloadable file; after that, it will be archived by the library, and may be rebroadcast.

Photos from the Exhibit Hall at WLIC 2014 in Lyon

 

 

IFLA’s World Library Information Congress 2014 in Lyon, France offers a modest-sized but busy exhibit hall. The hall opened Monday to a large crowd sampling new database offerings as well as information about associations and vendors from across the world. ALA’s booth was packed for the opening, and has remained busy.

 

 

High and Low Tech at World Library and Information Congress 2014 in Lyon, France

Journalist Florence Aubenas speaks at plenary sessionSometimes, low tech trumps high tech. At Tuesday morning’s plenary session of IFLA’s World Library and Information Congress 2014 in Lyon, French journalist Florence Aubenas talked about her kidnapping and six-month imprisonment in Iraq in 2005 and the time since.

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